Review of The Elements of Landscape Oil Painting

Art Books, Book Review
Elements of Landscape Oil Painting

Elements of Landscape Oil PaintingThe Elements of Landscape Oil Painting by Suzanne Brooker

Age range: Adult

Genre: Art, nonfiction

Hardcover: 208 pages

Publisher: Watson-Guptill; First Edition edition (August 18, 2015)

Source: Blogging for Books

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

 

 

 

 

About The Elements of Landscape Oil Painting:

A landscape painting guide for oil painters that breaks landscapes down into component elements from nature, and showcases tools and techniques used by classic and modern oil painters for bringing these scenes to life.

Landscape painting is one of the most popular subjects for painters working in the medium of oils–from classic masters to contemporary artists. In The Elements of Landscape Oil Painting, established Watson-Guptill author and noted instructor/painter Suzanne Brooker presents the fundamentals necessary for mastering landscape oil painting, breaking landscapes down into component parts: sky, terrain, trees, and water. Each featured element builds off the previous, with additional lessons on the latest brushes, paints, and other tools used by artists. Key methods like observation, rendering, and color mixing are supported by demonstration paintings and samples from a variety of the best landscape oil painters of all time. With The Elements of Landscape Oil Painting, oil painters looking to break into landscape painting or enhance their work will find all the necessary ingredients for success.

 

Find the Book:

Amazon | Goodreads | Barnes & Noble | Kobo

 

About the Author:

SUZANNE BROOKER received her BFA at the California Institute of the Arts in 1979, attended by invitation the Whitney Museum Independent Study program in New York City, and pursued her drawing studies at the School of Visual Arts. In 1990 Brooker returned to the West Coast and studied life drawing with Gary Faigin at the Gage Academy of Art and completed her MFA in figurative painting under Domenic Cretera at California State University, Long Beach. The author of Portrait Painting Atelier (2011), Brooker currently paints and teaches drawing and painting at the Gage Academy.

 

My Thoughts on The Elements of Landscape Oil Painting:

I got a serious rush of happiness the day this The Elements of Landscape Oil Painting showed up on my doorstep! For intermediate level artists, this is a wonderful resource for taking paintings to the next level. Each section explores an element of the landscape in depth, then provides several step by step examples. The author goes over strategies for rendering skies, water, earth, and trees, then puts them all together in the final chapter. I like her methodical approach to painting and her patient building up of layers to get the effect she wants.The thing I like about this book is that it offers new ideas and advice for intermediate artists. The author assumes you are already familiar with painting supplies and basic techniques, and she builds up from there.

I learned a lot from this book. In college, we used a limited palette of the three primary colors plus white. Black was banned from our supplies. I love the way Suzanne uses black as another color, another tool in her toolbox. She talks extensively on toning your canvas and how to choose the right tone to compliment your painting. She believes in planning out your painting and has some great ideas on how to do that so you can get better results. I love the advice she offers in this area. Her ideas are extremely helpful!

I’m so happy I read this book. I love the instruction on glazing and building up layers of paint. I can’t wait to put this information to use.

Content: Clean

5 STARS

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the Blogging for Books program in exchange for an honest review.

 

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