Two More New Picture Books From Kids Can Press

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Kids Can Press has released a bunch of beautiful new books this spring.  Check out the two that I featured yesterday HERE.  Today I am introducing two new books called The Mermaid and the Shoe and A Fish Named Glub.

The Mermaid and the Shoe by K.G. Campbell

Age Range: 3 – 7 years
 
Grade Level: Preschool – 2
 
Hardcover: 32 pages
 
Publisher: Kids Can Press (April 1, 2014)

Series: None

Genre: Picture book

Source: I received a digital galley from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

My Rating: 4 of 5 stars

About the Book:

Each of King Neptune’s 50 mermaid daughters boasts a special talent,
except for little Minnow, who seems to be good only at asking questions.
When she finds a strange object, Minnow follows her questions to a
wondrous place and finds answers, including the answer to the most
important question of all: Who am I? A gorgeously illustrated story
about finding one’s purpose.

My Thoughts:

This book is super cute. My girls, of course, loved it. I think they
mostly liked the illustrations of the mermaids, and I don’t blame them.
The artwork is beautiful. I love the colors the artist used.

The story is also very charming. It’s about the youngest mermaid of a
family of 50 girls. She feels like she doesn’t have anything special to
offer because she can’t sing well and fish don’t obey her. But then she
discovers something (a shoe) that takes her on an adventure where she
makes a huge discovery. I like the theme of being inquisitive and the
message that you don’t have to be just like everyone else in order to be
special. In fact, it’s the things that make you different that make you
special.

4 STARS

A Fish Named Glub by Dan Bar-el and Josee BiSaillon

Age Range: 4 – 8 years

Grade Level: Preschool – 3
 
Hardcover: 32 pages
 
Publisher: Kids Can Press (April 1, 2014)

Series: None

Genre: Picture book

Source: I received a digital galley from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

My Rating: 3 of 5 stars

About the Book:

In this truly original picture book, a fish named Glub ponders the big
questions (“Who am I?” “What do I need?” “Where do I belong?”) as he
looks out from his fishbowl at the end of the counter at Foster G.
Willikers’s diner. For every one of his questions, Glub instantly
receives an answer via the variety of conversations he overhears, as the
colorful people who frequent the diner go about the business of their
lives. At the same time, all these people, including Foster, are finding
some answers of their own as they look back at Glub swimming around in
his bowl.
Rich yet accessible collage-style
illustrations by Jos?e Bisaillon warmly invite readers into Glub’s world
on each of the spreads of this unique book, while the text alternates
between the poetry-inspired thoughts of Glub and the lively dialogue of
the humans. What award-winning children’s author and storyteller Dan
Bar-el manages to do in this moving and optimistic book is to present
two different layers within one story. There is the delightful, simple
narrative about what happens to Glub and the people in the diner — a
fun, humorous read-aloud, perfect for storytime. But there is also a
more reflective and poignant tale here of love, self-discovery and hope,
which provide an opportunity for deeper reading, understanding and
critical thinking, and which would make an excellent resource for a
character education lesson on dealing with feelings.

My Thoughts:

I’m not sure what to think about this picture book. On the plus side, the illustrations are
gorgeous. The artist has a unique style that I can’t help but be drawn to . In fact, the illustrations are what caused me to pick the book up
in the first place.

The story is beautifully written and has an interesting message to it.  I liked the fish’s search for home and his view on the world from inside his glass bowl.  However, I’m not sure that kids will like the story. I read it to my kids and they were both confused at the end. While the writing was fun, it was WAY over my kids’ heads. They didn’t understand what the book was about or what it was trying to say.  So I’m going straight down the middle
and giving it three stars.

3 STARS

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